Gender Equity in Academia: A First Aid Kit

Europe/Berlin
hybrid

hybrid

Room tbd
Description

Overview:

The goal of the workshop is to bring together specialists in the field of gender studies in STEM and science researchers. In the workshop, we expect the former specialists to educate the latter on the current problems related to women in STEM, starting with an overview of the present situation and culminating with the exposition of research-backed personal actions and policy making for the rapid achievement of gender-equity in scientific research. Complementarily, STEM researchers who have actively contributed to a more egalitarian academia will share their past experiences and ideas for the future. By the end of the workshop, ORIGINS members will ideally be aware of the main challenges faced by women pursuing a career in science research, as well as efficient overcoming strategies, and they will hopefully be inspired to take on an active attitude to the subject.

The first day will introduce the topic on a general basis, establishing the relevant nomenclature and providing contextualization, with a look at high-schools. The second day will concentrate on the current obstacles derived from power and gender dynamics. The third day will be devoted to the thinking of what a gender egalitarian academia entails, emphasizing the prevention of sexual harassment.

Audience:

All ORIGINS members, including graduate students, early career and senior researchers, as well as administration employees. Additionally, the workshop will be open-access.

Organizing Committee:

Advisory Committee:

 

Dr. Verónica Errasti Díez
    • Placing Ourselves
      • 1
        Beyond getting the record straight: the complex relation between gender and physics

        In 1977 Evelyn Fox Keller, a prominent scholar and one of those feminists who introduced the gender perspective in our histories of science, described her situation as a graduate student in one of the ivy league US universities as “an anomaly of a woman in physics.” The story of her graduate school experience was not only a difficult one but an indicative of the significant discriminations that women experienced at that time in ‘hard’ sciences such as physics. Recent Nature articles and reports of the American Institute of Physics assure us once again that women are still poorly represented in physics and face institutional sexism in big physics laboratories. Has, however, this relation between women and physics been always such a difficult one? Here I want to go beyond getting the historical record straight and restoring the names of women who succeeded in physics. Instead, moving away from notions of exclusions and constraints, I want to explore the mechanisms that historically allowed women—especially white, middle class European women—to craft spaces for themselves, acquire a laboratory bench for their own, and actively shape their discipline.

        Historically there have been several cases that women enjoyed a fairly satisfying status in their work. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries in fields such as radioactivity, astronomy and crystallography and in specific European laboratories and research schools, women were able to develop their own research programs, ensure research positions at top laboratories of the time, escape from the role of assistant to their male colleagues, and gain even university positions and international recognition. Without claiming that prewar research practices and laboratory cultures were not gendered biased at all, I see that women have not always been out of place and oddly positioned in the masculine world of physics. However, their position was transformed during the Second World War and was consolidated in the immediate postwar period. When physics research emigrated from Europe to the United States, followed by dramatic changes in politics and also research practices, women’s role in physics was downgraded from active researchers to assistants, untenured lecturers, and “unskilled” scanners in high energy physics laboratories. My question is what can history tell us not about women’s future in physics but about the future of physics in general?

        Speaker: Prof. Maria Rentetzi (Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen -Nürnberg)
      • 10:30 AM
        Coffee Break hybrid

        hybrid

        Room tbd
      • 2
        tbd
      • 3
        Of course! Inspiring stories about becoming a scientist in-person

        in-person

        room tbd

        I will present a project aiming at inspiring school children and students, and in particular women to study and have an academic career in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines. The comic books "Of course!" and "Of course!2" feature fifteen interviews of female and male role models working in meteorology, mathematics, marine biology, climate physics and astrophysics in Europe or North America. Each of these researchers experienced gender biases and imbalance at home, during their education, or at their work place. They made positive changes allowing them to lead a fulfilled life as a scientist, and sometimes to even change their work environment. Each interview is illustrated by a different artist. The result is a colourful collection of personal and inspiring stories covering a number of gender and diversity issues.

        Speaker: Dr Audine Laurian (Ludwig-Maximilians Universität, Meteorologisches Institut, "Waves to Weather" (CRC 165))
      • 12:30 PM
        Lunch Break hybrid

        hybrid

        Room tbd
      • 4
        tbd
        Speaker: Dr Tana D. Joseph
    • Power and gender
      • 5
        tbd
        Speaker: Prof. Hiromi Yokoyama
      • 10:30 AM
        Coffee Break
      • 6
        tbd
        Speaker: Prof. Paula-Irene Villa Braslavsky
      • 12:30 PM
        Lunch Break
      • 7
        tbd
        Speaker: Prof. Rohini M. Godbole
    • Imaging Equity
      • 8
        Sexual harassment in the workplace in-person

        in-person

        room tbd

        The seminar deals with the problem of sexual harassment in the workplace, legal protection for those affected and the duties of the supervisor and makes you familiar with concrete options for action.

        Where does sexual harassment start? What are the consequences of sexual harassment? What options of actions do I have, both as a person affected and as a bystander?

        Speaker: Mirjam Spies (Beratungsstelle Frauennotruf)
      • 10:30 AM
        Coffee Break hybrid

        hybrid

        Room tbd
      • 9
        tbd
        Speakers: Alessandro Bello, Dr Tonya Blowers
      • 12:30 PM
        Lunch Break hybrid

        hybrid

        Room tbd
      • 10
        tbd
        Speakers: Prof. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, Prof. Sarah Tuttle